Japan is moving faster towards hydrogen

Japan is moving faster toward hydrogen

If you can prove something like a hydrogen society can work in a city like Tokyo, then it’s a matter of how do they scale it, how do the Japanese ensure that all the ancillary consequences have been addressed, and you only really do this by testing it out.

Japan is moving faster than expected toward an hydrogen energy future. Prime Minister Abe has become a vocal advocate for hydrogen – both to stimulate developments in technology and to help the resource-poor nation lower greenhouse gases. With Japan relying more on fossil fuels since the shuttering of most of its nuclear reactors after the Fukushima disaster almost six years ago, it’s a push that’s gained more urgency.

Toyota is at the forefront of Japan’s efforts to use hydrogen and fuel cells to power cars, heat homes and keep factories running. Other companies pursuing the technology include Panasonic Corp, Toshiba Corp and JX Nippon Oil & Energy Corp. Read More

Can Hydrogen compete E-cars?

Can Hydrogen Cars compete with E-cars?

In the body of the study it becomes clear that FCVs do not beat internal combustion engines (ICEs) by much in equivalent fuel economy, And they are not much better in greenhouse gas emissions either, particularly in the liquid hydrogen versions, because of the energy required to transport and compress the hydrogen.

Hydrogen fuel cell cars appear to be making a comeback. But is this real? The comparison in question includes discussion of:

  • the wider process behind producing hydrogen fuel
  • the production itself
  • the compression/storage
  • the transportation of the fuel
  • associated factors

The future is a bit cloudy for hydrogen fuel cells (HFC), as electric vehicles have developed quickly and taken significant market share. Read More